Bird

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK

The sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter striatus) has been in breeding decline in BCR 14 for a long time although there is some evidence that it has either stabilized or increased lately. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SEDGE WREN

The sedge wren (Cistothorus platensis) is a rare and irregular breeder in BCR 14. It prefers wet meadows or the drier margins of marshes. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SCARLET TANAGER

The scarlet tanager (Piranga olivacea) is a common and widespread breeder in BCR 14. It prefers mature deciduous or mixed forest. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

RUFFED GROUSE

The ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) is categorized as fairly common in BCR 14. It is strongly associated with the aspen type but its ideal habitat includes a mix of forest types and brushy edges and openings with fruit-bearing shrubs. Forest openings of various sizes are also required for brood rearing. Sapling and pole hardwoods and aspen are important for escape and brood cover. Since the amount of young forest is declining in BCR 14, this species is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PURPLE MARTIN

The purple martin (Progne subis) is an uncommon to locally common breeder in scattered parts of BCR 14. It is a colonial nester and uses open areas adjacent to water bodies for feeding. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PURPLE FINCH

The purple finch (Carpodacus purpureus) is a common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It is more common in the northern portion. It prefers coniferous forest edges and uses mixed coniferous-deciduous forests also. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PRAIRIE WARBLER

The prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor) ranges from common in the southern part of BCR 14 to uncommon further north. It prefers dry thickets, shrubby second growth, Christmas tree plantations, abandoned gravel pits and dry abandoned fields. Its population is declining as abandoned openings revert to forest. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER

The olive-sided flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) is a fairly common breeder in northern New England, rarer in the southern part of BCR 14. It prefers high-elevation spruce-fir forests or the borders of northern bogs and muskegs. It needs tall exposed perches near openings of various sorts. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.