Mammal

SILVER-HAIRED BAT

The silver-haired bat (Laisonycteris noctivigans) is an uncommon migratory bat. In summer it roosts in hollow trees, loose bark or in bark furrows. It feeds primarily in fairly open habitats. Listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more of the states in BCR 14.

WATER SHREW

The water shrew (Sorex palustris) is a relatively uncommon species in BCR 14. It prefers wet areas and softwood edges along ponds, streams and other water bodies. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

SOUTHERN BOG LEMMING

The Southern bog lemming (Synaptomys cooperi) in an overall uncommon species in BCR 14 but can be common where it occurs. It prefers an herbaceous ground cover in a variety of forest types at lower elevations. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

ROCK VOLE

The rock vole (Microtus chrotorrhinus) is a rare species that usually occurs at higher elevations in coniferous or mixed wood types in BCR 14. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

INDIANA BAT

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), a federally-listed endangered species, occurs in BCR 14 but only in the Champlain Valley in Vermont. It hibernates in caves or mines and have been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas but its preference seems to be riparian forest. It hibernates in limestone caves and mines.

RED BAT

The red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is an uncommon to rare species in BCR 14. It is migratory and leaves the region in the winter. In summer it roosts in tree crowns or the crowns of shrubs in a number of forest types. It feeds over open water and among the trees. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT

The Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), is federally-listed as threatened and occurs in BCR 14. This species hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

Presume that these bats are present in or near your project. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. The 4d rule and individual state regulations will apply where your project is to take place.

NORTHERN BOG LEMMING

The Northern bog lemming (Synaptomys borealis) has a subspecies (Sphagnicola) found in BCR 14. It is quite rare and seems to occur mostly at high elevations although it has been found in sphagnum bogs, lowland spruce-fir and damp weedy meadows. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.