Mammal

MOOSE

Moose (Alces alces) are most common in the northern part of BCR 14 but their populations are decreasing, with the possible exception of northern Maine, across BCR 14. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

LONG-TAILED SHREW

The long-tailed shrew (Sorex dispar) status is undetermined in BCR 14, although it is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) in one or more states within the region. It is found in coniferous forest at higher elevations.

LITTLE BROWN BAT

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was a common species in BCR 14 but its populations are quickly declining throughout the region. These bats use caves or mines for hibernation and buildings for maternity areas. Their primary summer roost sites are in buildings. This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.

HOARY BAT

The hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) is an uncommon migratory bat that leaves the region in the winter for the most part. In summer it roosts in tree crowns of a number of pole to small sawtimber-sized forests but seems to prefer conifers. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

EASTERN SMALL-FOOTED BAT

The Eastern small-footed bat (Myotis leibii) is an uncommon species in BCR 14. It winters in caves and mines and uses cliffs, rocks and buildings in summer. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.

CANADA LYNX

Canada lynx are medium-sized cats, generally measuring 30 to 35 inches and weighing 18 to 23 pounds. They have large, well-furred feet and long legs for traversing snow; tufts on the ears; and short, black-tipped tails.

Moist boreal forests with cold, snowy winters and a snowshoe hare prey base describes lynx habitat. Maines’s relatively large, widely distributed population of lynx today is a legacy of the extensive clearcutting to salvage spruce and fir during the spruce budworm epidemic of the 1970s and 1980s.

BOBCAT

Bobcats are the most widely distributed wild felid in North America and are found in a broad variety of habitat types. They are listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

AMERICAN MARTEN

American marten (Martes americana), also known as pine marten or the American sable, belong to the weasel family and are closely related to fisher and mink. Marten, like other mustelids (weasels), are inquisitive animals, spending most of their time on the forest floor feeding on small mammals such as red backed voles and even snowshoe hare. Other common food sources include berries, nuts and carrion.

BIG BROWN BAT

The big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) was a common species in BCR 14. Its populations are declining due to white-nose syndrome. This species is most abundant in agricultural landscapes or in towns and cities but also uses a variety of forest types. It hibernates in caves, mines or buildings. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your property is in BCR14, contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. There can be individual state regulations that may apply.