Aspen

SILVER-HAIRED BAT

The silver-haired bat (Laisonycteris noctivigans) is an uncommon migratory bat. In summer it roosts in hollow trees, loose bark or in bark furrows. It feeds primarily in fairly open habitats. Listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more of the states in BCR 14.

WHIP-POOR-WILL

The whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferous) is fairly common in local areas. It prefers dry open woodlands or early successional forests often adjacent to large openings or wetlands. Its population numbers are declining throughout its range. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

RUFFED GROUSE

The ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) is categorized as fairly common in BCR 14. It is strongly associated with the aspen type but its ideal habitat includes a mix of forest types and brushy edges and openings with fruit-bearing shrubs. Forest openings of various sizes are also required for brood rearing. Sapling and pole hardwoods and aspen are important for escape and brood cover. Since the amount of young forest is declining in BCR 14, this species is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

INDIANA BAT

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), a federally-listed endangered species, occurs in BCR 14 but only in the Champlain Valley in Vermont. It hibernates in caves or mines and have been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas but its preference seems to be riparian forest. It hibernates in limestone caves and mines.

RED BAT

The red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is an uncommon to rare species in BCR 14. It is migratory and leaves the region in the winter. In summer it roosts in tree crowns or the crowns of shrubs in a number of forest types. It feeds over open water and among the trees. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT

The Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), is federally-listed as threatened and occurs in BCR 14. This species hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

Presume that these bats are present in or near your project. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. The 4d rule and individual state regulations will apply where your project is to take place.

NORTHERN BLACK RACER

The northern black racer (Coluber constrictor constrictor) is a long slender 36- to 72-inch black snake with a white chin that inhabits a wide variety of early successional habitats. It occurs at the northern edge of its range in southern Maine, central New Hampshire, and southern New York. Threats include development of upland habitat, habitat loss and mortality from sand and gravel mining, mortality from vehicles on roadways and utility rights-of-way, human persecution, den compaction from equipment, and habitat succession from grass and shrublands to forests.

MOURNING WARBLER

The Mourning warbler (Oporornis Philadelphia) is a locally common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It requires stands of dense saplings or shrubs resulting from clearcut logging, utility corridors, and other activities that create young forest habitat. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

LITTLE BROWN BAT

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was a common species in BCR 14 but its populations are quickly declining throughout the region. These bats use caves or mines for hibernation and buildings for maternity areas. Their primary summer roost sites are in buildings. This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.