Balsam Fir

SILVER-HAIRED BAT

The silver-haired bat (Laisonycteris noctivigans) is an uncommon migratory bat. In summer it roosts in hollow trees, loose bark or in bark furrows. It feeds primarily in fairly open habitats. Listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more of the states in BCR 14.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

THREE-TOED WOODPECKER

The three-toed woodpecker (Picoides tridactylus) is an uncommon resident in the northern part of BCR 14. It prefers mature to overmature spruce-fir forest with a component of standing dead trees used for foraging and nesting. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SPRUCE GROUSE

The spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) is either rare or uncommon in BCR 14. It requires large stands of dense coniferous forest for food and shelter. It occurs more frequently in the northern part of BCR 14 and is found in high-elevation spruce-fir and lowland spruce-fir along floodplains and bogs. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK

The sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter striatus) has been in breeding decline in BCR 14 for a long time although there is some evidence that it has either stabilized or increased lately. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

INDIANA BAT

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), a federally-listed endangered species, occurs in BCR 14 but only in the Champlain Valley in Vermont. It hibernates in caves or mines and have been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas but its preference seems to be riparian forest. It hibernates in limestone caves and mines.

RED BAT

The red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is an uncommon to rare species in BCR 14. It is migratory and leaves the region in the winter. In summer it roosts in tree crowns or the crowns of shrubs in a number of forest types. It feeds over open water and among the trees. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PURPLE FINCH

The purple finch (Carpodacus purpureus) is a common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It is more common in the northern portion. It prefers coniferous forest edges and uses mixed coniferous-deciduous forests also. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER

The olive-sided flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) is a fairly common breeder in northern New England, rarer in the southern part of BCR 14. It prefers high-elevation spruce-fir forests or the borders of northern bogs and muskegs. It needs tall exposed perches near openings of various sorts. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.