Hemlock

SILVER-HAIRED BAT

The silver-haired bat (Laisonycteris noctivigans) is an uncommon migratory bat. In summer it roosts in hollow trees, loose bark or in bark furrows. It feeds primarily in fairly open habitats. Listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more of the states in BCR 14.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

INDIANA BAT

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), a federally-listed endangered species, occurs in BCR 14 but only in the Champlain Valley in Vermont. It hibernates in caves or mines and have been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas but its preference seems to be riparian forest. It hibernates in limestone caves and mines.

RED BAT

The red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is an uncommon to rare species in BCR 14. It is migratory and leaves the region in the winter. In summer it roosts in tree crowns or the crowns of shrubs in a number of forest types. It feeds over open water and among the trees. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT

The Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), is federally-listed as threatened and occurs in BCR 14. This species hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

Presume that these bats are present in or near your project. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. The 4d rule and individual state regulations will apply where your project is to take place.

LONG-EARED OWL

The long-eared owl (Asio otis) is a rare and local breeder in the southern part of BCR 14. It generally requires dense coniferous forests or plantations for nesting. This owl has been in decline across its range. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

LITTLE BROWN BAT

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was a common species in BCR 14 but its populations are quickly declining throughout the region. These bats use caves or mines for hibernation and buildings for maternity areas. Their primary summer roost sites are in buildings. This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.

HOARY BAT

The hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) is an uncommon migratory bat that leaves the region in the winter for the most part. In summer it roosts in tree crowns of a number of pole to small sawtimber-sized forests but seems to prefer conifers. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.