Pine-Oak-Maple

SILVER-HAIRED BAT

The silver-haired bat (Laisonycteris noctivigans) is an uncommon migratory bat. In summer it roosts in hollow trees, loose bark or in bark furrows. It feeds primarily in fairly open habitats. Listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more of the states in BCR 14.

YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO

The yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) is an uncommon but fairly widespread breeder in BCR 14. It prefers low, dense, shrubby deciduous vegetation. This bird is declining throughout its range. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

WORM-EATING WARBLER

The worm-eating warbler (Helmitheros vermivorus) is a locally common to rare breeder in the southern part of BCR 14 only. It prefers deciduous or mixed mature forests with ravines or steep hillsides. It is very sensitive to forest fragmentation. This warbler is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

WOOD THRUSH

The wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) is a common but declining species in BCR14. It prefers mature, moist deciduous or mixed closed canopy forest. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

WHIP-POOR-WILL

The whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferous) is fairly common in local areas. It prefers dry open woodlands or early successional forests often adjacent to large openings or wetlands. Its population numbers are declining throughout its range. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

TIMBER RATTLESNAKE

The timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) is a large, thick-bodied snake between 3 and 5 feet long. Individuals may be mostly black or patterned with yellow and brown. They have a broad triangular head and keeled scales that give a rough appearance. At the end of the tail is a large, blunt rattle. In New England, they are listed as extirpated in Maine and Rhode Island, and endangered in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire. They are sit-and-wait predators feeding mostly on small mammals.

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK

The sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter striatus) has been in breeding decline in BCR 14 for a long time although there is some evidence that it has either stabilized or increased lately. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SCARLET TANAGER

The scarlet tanager (Piranga olivacea) is a common and widespread breeder in BCR 14. It prefers mature deciduous or mixed forest. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.