Speckled Alder

SILVER-HAIRED BAT

The silver-haired bat (Laisonycteris noctivigans) is an uncommon migratory bat. In summer it roosts in hollow trees, loose bark or in bark furrows. It feeds primarily in fairly open habitats. Listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more of the states in BCR 14.

WOOD TURTLE

The wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) is a medium-sized turtle, recognizable by its sculpted shell and orange coloration on the neck and forelimbs. Considered a semi-aquatic and semi-terrestrial turtle, they overwinter in streams and spend most of the late spring and summer in upland habitats. Threats include development of upland habitats near streams, mortality from mowing and agricultural machinery, mortality from vehicles on roadways, and illegal casual or commercial collection. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in all six states in BCR 14.

WATER SHREW

The water shrew (Sorex palustris) is a relatively uncommon species in BCR 14. It prefers wet areas and softwood edges along ponds, streams and other water bodies. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

SPOTTED TURTLE

The spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata) is a small, 3- to 5-inch dark or black turtle with yellow or orange spots marking its smooth carapace, head, and limbs. The number of spots is variable and changes with age; hatchlings typically have one spot per scute, while adults may have more than 100. Though the spotted turtle is considered semi-aquatic, it spends considerable time on land. The spotted turtle is declining throughout the eastern United States and receives protection from most states within its range.

SOUTHERN BOG LEMMING

The Southern bog lemming (Synaptomys cooperi) in an overall uncommon species in BCR 14 but can be common where it occurs. It prefers an herbaceous ground cover in a variety of forest types at lower elevations. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SORA

The sora (Porzana carolina) is a rare breeder in BCR 14. It prefers large marshes and wetlands with abundant emergent vegetation such as cattails. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SEDGE WREN

The sedge wren (Cistothorus platensis) is a rare and irregular breeder in BCR 14. It prefers wet meadows or the drier margins of marshes. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

INDIANA BAT

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), a federally-listed endangered species, occurs in BCR 14 but only in the Champlain Valley in Vermont. It hibernates in caves or mines and have been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas but its preference seems to be riparian forest. It hibernates in limestone caves and mines.