Upland

SILVER-HAIRED BAT

The silver-haired bat (Laisonycteris noctivigans) is an uncommon migratory bat. In summer it roosts in hollow trees, loose bark or in bark furrows. It feeds primarily in fairly open habitats. Listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more of the states in BCR 14.

WOOD TURTLE

The wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) is a medium-sized turtle, recognizable by its sculpted shell and orange coloration on the neck and forelimbs. Considered a semi-aquatic and semi-terrestrial turtle, they overwinter in streams and spend most of the late spring and summer in upland habitats. Threats include development of upland habitats near streams, mortality from mowing and agricultural machinery, mortality from vehicles on roadways, and illegal casual or commercial collection. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in all six states in BCR 14.

VESPER SPARROW

The vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) is an uncommon and local breeder. Its populations are declining across BCR 14. It prefers dry upland areas with short sparse herbaceous vegetation and conspicuous singing perches. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

INDIANA BAT

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), a federally-listed endangered species, occurs in BCR 14 but only in the Champlain Valley in Vermont. It hibernates in caves or mines and have been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas but its preference seems to be riparian forest. It hibernates in limestone caves and mines.

RED BAT

The red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is an uncommon to rare species in BCR 14. It is migratory and leaves the region in the winter. In summer it roosts in tree crowns or the crowns of shrubs in a number of forest types. It feeds over open water and among the trees. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PURPLE MARTIN

The purple martin (Progne subis) is an uncommon to locally common breeder in scattered parts of BCR 14. It is a colonial nester and uses open areas adjacent to water bodies for feeding. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PRAIRIE WARBLER

The prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor) ranges from common in the southern part of BCR 14 to uncommon further north. It prefers dry thickets, shrubby second growth, Christmas tree plantations, abandoned gravel pits and dry abandoned fields. Its population is declining as abandoned openings revert to forest. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN WATER THRUSH

The Northern water thrush (Seiurus noveboracensis) is an uncommon to locally common species in BCR14. It prefers cool, shady, wet brushy areas near open pools of water or swampy hummocks. This waterthrush has been listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT

The Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), is federally-listed as threatened and occurs in BCR 14. This species hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

Presume that these bats are present in or near your project. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. The 4d rule and individual state regulations will apply where your project is to take place.