Upland

NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG

The northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) is a 2- to 3½-inch slender brownish or green frog with two or three rows of irregular rounded dark spots with pale borders. It is often confused with the pickerel frog (Lithobates palustris), which has squarish dark spots and bright yellow or orange inner thighs. They are most often associated with rivers and floodplains. Threats include habitat conversion due to development, mortality from mowing and agricultural machinery, mortality from vehicles on roadways, and mortality and reduced fitness from pesticides.

NORTHERN BLACK RACER

The northern black racer (Coluber constrictor constrictor) is a long slender 36- to 72-inch black snake with a white chin that inhabits a wide variety of early successional habitats. It occurs at the northern edge of its range in southern Maine, central New Hampshire, and southern New York. Threats include development of upland habitat, habitat loss and mortality from sand and gravel mining, mortality from vehicles on roadways and utility rights-of-way, human persecution, den compaction from equipment, and habitat succession from grass and shrublands to forests.

LITTLE BROWN BAT

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was a common species in BCR 14 but its populations are quickly declining throughout the region. These bats use caves or mines for hibernation and buildings for maternity areas. Their primary summer roost sites are in buildings. This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.

HOARY BAT

The hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) is an uncommon migratory bat that leaves the region in the winter for the most part. In summer it roosts in tree crowns of a number of pole to small sawtimber-sized forests but seems to prefer conifers. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

FIELD SPARROW

The field sparrow (Spizella pusilla) is a common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It prefers open grassy areas with low shrubs or trees. These sparrows are at the northern limits of their breeding range in BCR 14 and are declining with forest succession and development. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

EASTERN SMALL-FOOTED BAT

The Eastern small-footed bat (Myotis leibii) is an uncommon species in BCR 14. It winters in caves and mines and uses cliffs, rocks and buildings in summer. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.

EASTERN MEADOWLARK

The Eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna) is a declining species in BCR 14. It prefers extensive open grassland with elevated perches. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

EASTERN KINGBIRD

The Eastern kingbird (Tyrannus tryannus) is relatively common in BCR 14. It prefers open areas with scattered trees to perch in for feeding. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in at least one state in BCR14.

EASTERN HOGNOSE SNAKE

The eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) is a thick bodied snake measuring 20 to 35 inches with a characteristic upturned snout and keeled dorsal scales. The dark phase tends to be uniform grayish-black. It has a dramatic defense display including hissing, mock-striking, and playing dead. Generally, they need sandy, gravelly soils typically associated with open fields, river valleys, pine forests, and upland hillsides. High-ranking threats include development of upland habitats, sand and gravel mining, and mortality from vehicles on roadways.