Upland

EASTERN BOX TURTLE

The eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) is a small 4.5- to 7-inch terrestrial turtle with a highly domed shell and variable patterning. Color patterns of the carapace typically consist of irregular yellow or orange markings over a brown or black base. The skin is uniformly dark with yellow or orange markings. They use a variety of dry and moist upland habitats. Females excavate nests in the summer in loose, loamy soil in open areas. Winter hibernation usually occurs under soil, decaying vegetation, or mammal burrows in forests.

CLIFF SWALLOW

The cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) is a common to locally common breeder in the northern portions of BCR 14. It prefers open areas such as grassy meadows or water bodies for feeding on insects. It will nest wherever there is an appropriate vertical substrate with an overhang. It will also use structures such as bridges. The availability of large open areas will likely be the limiting factor in the future. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

BOBOLINK

The bobolink (Delichonyx oryzivorus) is a locally common breeder in BCR 14. Its populations have been declining due to the loss of the grasslands it uses as habitat. Modern mowing practices are also adversely affecting this species. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

BLUE-WINGED WARBLER

The blue-winged warbler (Vermivora pinus) is an uncommon to locally common breeder whose population s apparently increasing. It is a breeder in the southern part of BCR 14 up to southern New Hampshire. The blue-wing prefers reverting old fields with scattered shrubs and small trees near water. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

BLACK RAT SNAKE

The black rat snake (Pantherophis spp.) is a long, powerful constrictor reaching up to 6 feet in length. Adults are mostly black or brown with white, yellow or red in between the scales. The undersides are mostly white with dark blotches. Throughout their range, rat snakes are declining in many states. Populations are threatened by habitat alteration, collection for pet trade, roads, and increasing homogeneity of habitats from clearing or maturation of abandoned fields. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in four states in BCR 14.

BANK SWALLOW

The bank swallow (Riparia riparia) is locally common at scattered locations throughout the region. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

BLANDING'S TURTLE

The Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) is a 7- to 9-inch turtle with yellow speckles that often run together to form streaks on the carapace. It is easily identified when basking from its characteristic yellow throat and chin. It uses a variety of shallow wetland habitats including marshes, swamps, bogs, ponds, and vernal pools. Females make long distance upland movements in search of suitable sandy or loamy, full-sun, nesting habitats where they are most vulnerable to mortality from vehicles when crossing roadways.

AMERICAN KESTREL

The American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) is a fairly common breeder in the central and northern part of BCR 14. It is a cavity nester and prefers forested edges of grasslands, pastures, larger beaver flowages and utility rights-of-way. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

BIG BROWN BAT

The big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) was a common species in BCR 14. Its populations are declining due to white-nose syndrome. This species is most abundant in agricultural landscapes or in towns and cities but also uses a variety of forest types. It hibernates in caves, mines or buildings. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your property is in BCR14, contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. There can be individual state regulations that may apply.

YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT

The yellow-breasted chat (Icteria virens) is a rare, local and erratic breeder in the southern part only of BCR 14. It prefers dense shrubs and vines with no overtopping trees, often near water. Chat populations are declining as more open land reverts to forest. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.