Yellow Birch

RED BAT

The red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is an uncommon to rare species in BCR 14. It is migratory and leaves the region in the winter. In summer it roosts in tree crowns or the crowns of shrubs in a number of forest types. It feeds over open water and among the trees. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT

The Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), is federally-listed as threatened and occurs in BCR 14. This species hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

Presume that these bats are present in or near your project. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. The 4d rule and individual state regulations will apply where your project is to take place.

NORTHERN GOSHAWK

The Northern goshawk (Accipiter gentiles) is an uncommon to rare nester in BCR 14. It nests in the interior of pine, hemlock or mixed mature forest. It is sensitive to disturbance during the courtship and nesting season (March through the end of July). Its numbers are apparently increasing. The goshawk appears on the Species of Greatest Conservation Need list in one or more states in BCR 14.

MOURNING WARBLER

The Mourning warbler (Oporornis Philadelphia) is a locally common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It requires stands of dense saplings or shrubs resulting from clearcut logging, utility corridors, and other activities that create young forest habitat. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

MOOSE

Moose (Alces alces) are most common in the northern part of BCR 14 but their populations are decreasing, with the possible exception of northern Maine, across BCR 14. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

LITTLE BROWN BAT

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was a common species in BCR 14 but its populations are quickly declining throughout the region. These bats use caves or mines for hibernation and buildings for maternity areas. Their primary summer roost sites are in buildings. This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.

HOARY BAT

The hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) is an uncommon migratory bat that leaves the region in the winter for the most part. In summer it roosts in tree crowns of a number of pole to small sawtimber-sized forests but seems to prefer conifers. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

FIVE-LINED SKINK

As its name implies, the five-lined skink (Eumeces fasciatus) has five cream-colored lines extending the length of its greenish black body. Juveniles have bright blue tail tips that eventually fade to bronze with age. Five-lined skinks are broadly distributed and common in parts of their range, but rare or declining in many states. Habitat loss or degradation is a major cause of population declines, along with predation and collection for the pet trade. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in three states in BCR 14.

FIELD SPARROW

The field sparrow (Spizella pusilla) is a common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It prefers open grassy areas with low shrubs or trees. These sparrows are at the northern limits of their breeding range in BCR 14 and are declining with forest succession and development. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.