Species of Greatest Conservation Need

Species of Greatest Conservation Need

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ALDER FLYCATCHER

The alder flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) is an uncommon breeder in BCR 14 with the exception of Maine where it is more common. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

AMERICAN BLACK DUCK

The American black duck (Anas rubripes) is a common to fairly common breeder in BCR 14. It uses a wide variety of fresh water habitats and nests in thick understories of shrubs or hardwood or softwood regeneration. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. Black duck populations are declining due to habitat loss and hybridization with mallards.

AMERICAN KESTREL

The American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) is a fairly common breeder in the central and northern part of BCR 14. It is a cavity nester and prefers forested edges of grasslands, pastures, larger beaver flowages and utility rights-of-way. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

AMERICAN MARTEN

American marten (Martes americana), also known as pine marten or the American sable, belong to the weasel family and are closely related to fisher and mink. Marten, like other mustelids (weasels), are inquisitive animals, spending most of their time on the forest floor feeding on small mammals such as red backed voles and even snowshoe hare. Other common food sources include berries, nuts and carrion.

BANK SWALLOW

The bank swallow (Riparia riparia) is locally common at scattered locations throughout the region. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

BAY-BREASTED WARBLER

The bay-breasted warbler (Dendroica castanea) is a common to rare breeder mostly in the northern part of BCR 14. It prefers second growth boreal forest containing balsam fir. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

BICKNELL'S THRUSH

The Bicknell’s thrush (Catharus bicknelli) is locally common to uncommon in BCR 14. It requires high-elevation stunted spruce-fir forests for nesting and cover. It has also been reported in low-elevation coastal softwood areas, particularly in maritime Canada. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. Its population may or may not be declining; however, since its habitat availability is limited and fragile, it is a species of concern.

BIG BROWN BAT

The big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) was a common species in BCR 14. Its populations are declining due to white-nose syndrome. This species is most abundant in agricultural landscapes or in towns and cities but also uses a variety of forest types. It hibernates in caves, mines or buildings. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your property is in BCR14, contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. There can be individual state regulations that may apply.