Species of Greatest Conservation Need

Species of Greatest Conservation Need

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BROWN THRASHER

The brown thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) is common to fairly common in BCR 14. It prefers low dense woody thickets in the oak, pine-oak-maple or pine communities for nesting or for cover. Thrasher populations are declining as forests mature and low thickets become shaded out. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

CANADA LYNX

Canada lynx are medium-sized cats, generally measuring 30 to 35 inches and weighing 18 to 23 pounds. They have large, well-furred feet and long legs for traversing snow; tufts on the ears; and short, black-tipped tails.

Moist boreal forests with cold, snowy winters and a snowshoe hare prey base describes lynx habitat. Maines’s relatively large, widely distributed population of lynx today is a legacy of the extensive clearcutting to salvage spruce and fir during the spruce budworm epidemic of the 1970s and 1980s.

CANADA WARBLER

The Canada warbler (Wilsonia Canadensis) is a fairly common breeder in BCR 14. It prefers deciduous forest with a dense understory, especially along streams, bogs, swamps or moist areas. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

CAPE MAY WARBLER

The Cape May warbler (Dendroica tigrina) is a scarce to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It prefers boreal situations containing mature spruce. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

CERULEAN WARBLER

The cerulean warbler (Dendroica cerulea) is a rare and local breeder primarily in the southern portions of BCR 14. Its population may be slowly increasing due to forest maturation. It prefers extensive mature deciduous forest in floodplain situations. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

CLIFF SWALLOW

The cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) is a common to locally common breeder in the northern portions of BCR 14. It prefers open areas such as grassy meadows or water bodies for feeding on insects. It will nest wherever there is an appropriate vertical substrate with an overhang. It will also use structures such as bridges. The availability of large open areas will likely be the limiting factor in the future. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

COMMON NIGHTHAWK

The common nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) was a relatively common breeder throughout BCR 14 but its populations are declining rapidly. It prefers large open grasslands, burned over woodlands and early stage large clearcuts. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

EASTERN BOX TURTLE

The eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) is a small 4.5- to 7-inch terrestrial turtle with a highly domed shell and variable patterning. Color patterns of the carapace typically consist of irregular yellow or orange markings over a brown or black base. The skin is uniformly dark with yellow or orange markings. They use a variety of dry and moist upland habitats. Females excavate nests in the summer in loose, loamy soil in open areas. Winter hibernation usually occurs under soil, decaying vegetation, or mammal burrows in forests.

EASTERN HOGNOSE SNAKE

The eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) is a thick bodied snake measuring 20 to 35 inches with a characteristic upturned snout and keeled dorsal scales. The dark phase tends to be uniform grayish-black. It has a dramatic defense display including hissing, mock-striking, and playing dead. Generally, they need sandy, gravelly soils typically associated with open fields, river valleys, pine forests, and upland hillsides. High-ranking threats include development of upland habitats, sand and gravel mining, and mortality from vehicles on roadways.

EASTERN KINGBIRD

The Eastern kingbird (Tyrannus tryannus) is relatively common in BCR 14. It prefers open areas with scattered trees to perch in for feeding. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in at least one state in BCR14.