Species of Greatest Conservation Need

Species of Greatest Conservation Need

Use one, or both, of the filters below to find what you are interested in.

LEAST BITTERN

The least bittern (Ixobrychus exilis) is a rare and local breeder in BCR 14. Its habitat is restricted to freshwater wetlands with tall dense vegetation. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

LITTLE BROWN BAT

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was a common species in BCR 14 but its populations are quickly declining throughout the region. These bats use caves or mines for hibernation and buildings for maternity areas. Their primary summer roost sites are in buildings. This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

If your project is in BCR 14, you are in a state where these bats occur. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. Individual state regulations may apply.

LONG-EARED OWL

The long-eared owl (Asio otis) is a rare and local breeder in the southern part of BCR 14. It generally requires dense coniferous forests or plantations for nesting. This owl has been in decline across its range. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

LONG-TAILED SHREW

The long-tailed shrew (Sorex dispar) status is undetermined in BCR 14, although it is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) in one or more states within the region. It is found in coniferous forest at higher elevations.

MINK FROG

The mink frog (Lithobates septentrionalis), sometimes called the “frog of the north,” is a 1½ - to 3-inch greenish frog with irregular spots mottled along the back and hind legs. It is often confused with the green frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota), but often lacks a dorsal ridge and the webbing on the toes of hind feet extends to the last joint on the 4th toe and to the tip of the 5th toe. The most conspicuous identifying characteristic is the strong “rotten onion” smell when handled.

MOOSE

Moose (Alces alces) are most common in the northern part of BCR 14 but their populations are decreasing, with the possible exception of northern Maine, across BCR 14. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

MOURNING WARBLER

The Mourning warbler (Oporornis Philadelphia) is a locally common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It requires stands of dense saplings or shrubs resulting from clearcut logging, utility corridors, and other activities that create young forest habitat. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN BLACK RACER

The northern black racer (Coluber constrictor constrictor) is a long slender 36- to 72-inch black snake with a white chin that inhabits a wide variety of early successional habitats. It occurs at the northern edge of its range in southern Maine, central New Hampshire, and southern New York. Threats include development of upland habitat, habitat loss and mortality from sand and gravel mining, mortality from vehicles on roadways and utility rights-of-way, human persecution, den compaction from equipment, and habitat succession from grass and shrublands to forests.

NORTHERN BOG LEMMING

The Northern bog lemming (Synaptomys borealis) has a subspecies (Sphagnicola) found in BCR 14. It is quite rare and seems to occur mostly at high elevations although it has been found in sphagnum bogs, lowland spruce-fir and damp weedy meadows. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.