Species of Greatest Conservation Need

Species of Greatest Conservation Need

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NORTHERN GOSHAWK

The Northern goshawk (Accipiter gentiles) is an uncommon to rare nester in BCR 14. It nests in the interior of pine, hemlock or mixed mature forest. It is sensitive to disturbance during the courtship and nesting season (March through the end of July). Its numbers are apparently increasing. The goshawk appears on the Species of Greatest Conservation Need list in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN HARRIER

The Northern harrier (Circus cyaneus) is a rare and local breeder in BCR 14. It prefers open areas including marshes and upland fields containing brushy clumps for nesting. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG

The northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) is a 2- to 3½-inch slender brownish or green frog with two or three rows of irregular rounded dark spots with pale borders. It is often confused with the pickerel frog (Lithobates palustris), which has squarish dark spots and bright yellow or orange inner thighs. They are most often associated with rivers and floodplains. Threats include habitat conversion due to development, mortality from mowing and agricultural machinery, mortality from vehicles on roadways, and mortality and reduced fitness from pesticides.

NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT

The Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), is federally-listed as threatened and occurs in BCR 14. This species hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). This bat is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

Presume that these bats are present in or near your project. Contact your state wildlife agency before implementing a project. The 4d rule and individual state regulations will apply where your project is to take place.

NORTHERN WATER THRUSH

The Northern water thrush (Seiurus noveboracensis) is an uncommon to locally common species in BCR14. It prefers cool, shady, wet brushy areas near open pools of water or swampy hummocks. This waterthrush has been listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER

The olive-sided flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) is a fairly common breeder in northern New England, rarer in the southern part of BCR 14. It prefers high-elevation spruce-fir forests or the borders of northern bogs and muskegs. It needs tall exposed perches near openings of various sorts. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

 

PRAIRIE WARBLER

The prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor) ranges from common in the southern part of BCR 14 to uncommon further north. It prefers dry thickets, shrubby second growth, Christmas tree plantations, abandoned gravel pits and dry abandoned fields. Its population is declining as abandoned openings revert to forest. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PURPLE FINCH

The purple finch (Carpodacus purpureus) is a common to uncommon breeder in BCR 14. It is more common in the northern portion. It prefers coniferous forest edges and uses mixed coniferous-deciduous forests also. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

PURPLE MARTIN

The purple martin (Progne subis) is an uncommon to locally common breeder in scattered parts of BCR 14. It is a colonial nester and uses open areas adjacent to water bodies for feeding. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

RED BAT

The red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is an uncommon to rare species in BCR 14. It is migratory and leaves the region in the winter. In summer it roosts in tree crowns or the crowns of shrubs in a number of forest types. It feeds over open water and among the trees. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.