Species of Greatest Conservation Need

Species of Greatest Conservation Need

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SOUTHERN BOG LEMMING

The Southern bog lemming (Synaptomys cooperi) in an overall uncommon species in BCR 14 but can be common where it occurs. It prefers an herbaceous ground cover in a variety of forest types at lower elevations. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

SPOTTED TURTLE

The spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata) is a small, 3- to 5-inch dark or black turtle with yellow or orange spots marking its smooth carapace, head, and limbs. The number of spots is variable and changes with age; hatchlings typically have one spot per scute, while adults may have more than 100. Though the spotted turtle is considered semi-aquatic, it spends considerable time on land. The spotted turtle is declining throughout the eastern United States and receives protection from most states within its range.

SPRUCE GROUSE

The spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) is either rare or uncommon in BCR 14. It requires large stands of dense coniferous forest for food and shelter. It occurs more frequently in the northern part of BCR 14 and is found in high-elevation spruce-fir and lowland spruce-fir along floodplains and bogs. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

THREE-TOED WOODPECKER

The three-toed woodpecker (Picoides tridactylus) is an uncommon resident in the northern part of BCR 14. It prefers mature to overmature spruce-fir forest with a component of standing dead trees used for foraging and nesting. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

TIMBER RATTLESNAKE

The timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) is a large, thick-bodied snake between 3 and 5 feet long. Individuals may be mostly black or patterned with yellow and brown. They have a broad triangular head and keeled scales that give a rough appearance. At the end of the tail is a large, blunt rattle. In New England, they are listed as extirpated in Maine and Rhode Island, and endangered in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire. They are sit-and-wait predators feeding mostly on small mammals.

TRI-COLORED BAT

The tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is an uncommon species that occurs in BCR 14. It hibernates in caves or mines and has been severely impacted by the white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14. It uses a variety of forest types for summer roosting and maternity areas. This species was formerly known as the Eastern pipistrelle.

VEERY

The veery (Catharus fuscescens) is a common breeder in BCR 14. It prefers moist woodlands with a thick understory of trees and shrubs. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

VESPER SPARROW

The vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) is an uncommon and local breeder. Its populations are declining across BCR 14. It prefers dry upland areas with short sparse herbaceous vegetation and conspicuous singing perches. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

WATER SHREW

The water shrew (Sorex palustris) is a relatively uncommon species in BCR 14. It prefers wet areas and softwood edges along ponds, streams and other water bodies. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.

WHIP-POOR-WILL

The whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferous) is fairly common in local areas. It prefers dry open woodlands or early successional forests often adjacent to large openings or wetlands. Its population numbers are declining throughout its range. It is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need in one or more states in BCR 14.